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Music and Dirt Festival celebrates school gardens

Music and Dirt Festival celebrates school gardens

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Now you can get the dirt on a program that’s building students’ interest in gardening while you’re enjoying music at the same time.

The inaugural Planting Seeds Festival of Music and Dirt will be from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at Buford Middle School. It is sponsored by City Schoolyard Garden, the Charlottesville City Schools and city elementary school PTOs.

Music will be performed by Don’t Tell Darlings, Rich Goodling, Carmen and Juliet, Blue Ridge Music Together, Jan Smith, Adrienne Young and a special guest. There also will be sing-alongs.

There will be food from Marco and Luca Dumplings, Great Harvest Bread Company, Zazus, Eppie’s, Wayside, Carpe Donut and other places.

Students will be able to get their faces painted, make hats and visit Bellair Farm’s planting station and the Green Adventure Project’s bee table.

Buford is the site of City Schoolyard Garden’s original garden, which was launched in the spring of 2010. The garden has been included in lesson plans for classes in art, life science, Spanish, French and English as a Second Language, and the project is expanding to elementary schools.

The free event will take place rain or shine. Learn more by visiting www.CitySchoolyardGarden.org or by calling 906-4142.

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