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41 (20)

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Issue 41, 2020

Founded by Betty Debnam

‘Be that as it may’

Mini Fact:

In Other
Words

Although Shakespeare’s words are
familiar to us today, we don’t have any
manuscripts of his work in his own
handwriting. In 1623,
two of his actor friends
published the “First
Folio.” A folio (FOlee-o) is a special kind
of book.
There are only
232 known copies
of the First Folio
still in existence.
Unfortunately, no two
are exactly alike. Printers of the time put
the folios together in different orders.
Sometimes they decided to correct what
they thought were errors; punctuation was
put in differently, and the spellings of some
words changed. Actors and directors may
have changed things in the plays too.
By looking at all the versions, scholars
have put together what they believe are the
most accurate scripts.
The First Folio contains 36 of
Shakespeare’s plays. If we didn’t have this
book, we would have lost about half of his
plays, including “Macbeth” and “Twelfth
Night.”

Title Page. William Shakespeare. Plays. 1623. London.
Courtesy Folger Shakespeare Library

This illustration
is from the
final scene of
“All’s Well That
Ends Well,” a
comedy by
Shakespeare.

If you have ever been in a pickle, tonguetied, had too much of a good thing, refused
to budge an inch,
or heard your folks
say, “You’ve eaten
me out of house and
home,” then you’ve
been living with the
words of William
Shakespeare.
He was able to
put words together so
beautifully that today, almost 460 years after
his birth, we are still quoting Shakespeare.

Alberto Sangorski. Songs and Sonnets by William
Shakespeare. Manuscript, 1926 (Detail).

George Sigmund Facius,
printmaker, Folger
Shakespeare Library

‘All the world’s a stage’

Shakespeare invented hundreds of words,
used them in brand-new ways and wrote lines
that opened up new ways of seeing. Words
from his plays and poems still ring true today.
His plays include “Romeo and Juliet,”
“Hamlet” and “Julius Caesar.” He is also
famous for a special kind of poetry called a
sonnet (SAHN-ut).

‘The play’s the thing’

People in Shakespeare’s time loved to play
with words. They also loved proverbs, or
sayings. Shakespeare shared these loves. He
invented hundreds of sayings.
Some of the language may have already
been in use at the time, but his works are the
only record we have of it.
Let’s explore some of Shakespeare’s words
that we still use today.

• If you’ve ever been
to a high school or
college graduation
ceremony, you
probably heard a song called “Pomp and
Circumstance.” This phrase comes from Act
3 of Shakespeare’s play “Othello,” but the
characters aren’t talking about high school.
“Pomp and circumstance” in this case refers to
the ceremony and excitement of warfare.
• Family members
will sometimes call
Your own flesh
each other their “own
and blood
flesh and blood.”
Shakespeare used
this phrase in several of his plays, including
“Hamlet” and “Merchant of Venice.”
• This funny
saying
is from
Eaten me out of
the play “Henry
house and home the Fourth.” A
woman who takes
in boarders, or people who rent a room, is
talking about Sir John Falstaff, who “hath put
all my substance into
that fat belly of his.”
For goodness’
• You might say
sake
“For goodness’ sake!”
when you drop a ball
or trip on a branch. But Shakespeare meant it
differently. In “Henry the Eighth,” it means
“for the sake of goodness and decency.”

Pomp and
circumstance

Resources
On the Web:

• folger.edu/shakespeare-kids

At the library:

• “A Stage Full of Shakespeare Stories” by
Angela McAllister
• “Flibbertigibetty Words: Young
Shakespeare Chases Inspiration” by
Donna Guthrie

The Mini Page® © 2020 Andrews McMeel Syndication

Try ’n’ Find

Mini Jokes

Words that remind us of Shakespeare are hidden in this
puzzle. Some words are hidden backward or diagonally,
and some letters are used twice. See if you can find:
BOOK, CAESAR, FOLIO,
HAMLET, JULIET,
LANGUAGE, OTHELLO,
PHRASE, PLAY,
PROVERB, QUOTE,
RECORD, ROMEO,
SAYING, SHAKESPEARE,
SONNET, WARFARE,
WILLIAM, WORDS.

J
U
L
I
E
T
S
P
J
S

S
K
I
R
E
Z
H
T
U
A

O
U
F
W
R
R
A
E
S
Y

M
A
R
X
A
S
K
L
J
I

A
D
S
S
F
D
E
M
P
N

I
K
E
D
R
R
S
A
R
G

L
O
O
R
A
O
P
H
O
J

L
O
S
O
W
W
E
P
V
V

I
I
J
C
B
C
A
L
E
Q

W
L
O
E
M
O
R
A
R
U

J
O
J
R
I
X
E
Y
B
O

Z
F
P
R
S
O
N
N
E
T

R
V
O
T
H
E
L
L
O
E

R
A
S
E
A
C
P
W
B
N

Sylvester: What was the
bald man’s
dilemma?
Stanley: “Toupee or not toupee, that is
the question!”

O
U
E
G
A
U
G
N
A
L

Eco Note
The official thermometer
at California’s Death Valley measured
an air temperature of 130 degrees
Fahrenheit on Aug. 16, which
meteorologists say could be
the hottest ever recorded on
the planet. While a reading
of 134 degrees was taken in
Death Valley in 1913, recent
studies suggest it was
incorrect because of observer error.

• 2 teaspoons salt-free
Italian seasoning
• 2 cups baby carrots
• 1 cup reduced-sodium
chicken broth

What to do:
1. Arrange onion in bottom of a slow cooker. Season both sides of chicken with salt and
pepper and place on top of onion.
2. Rub Italian seasoning into top of chicken. Arrange carrots alongside chicken and pour
broth over all.
3. Cover and cook on low for 6 to 8 hours, until chicken is cooked through. Serves 4.
Adapted from “The Robin Takes 5 Cookbook for Busy Families” with permission from Andrews McMeel Publishing (andrewsmcmeel.com).

7 Little Words for Kids

Use the letters in the boxes to make a word with the same meaning as
the clue. The numbers in parentheses represent the number of letters in
the solution. Each letter combination can be used only once, but all letter
combinations will be necessary to complete the puzzle.

1. it turns the light on (6)
2. make clean and shiny (6)
3. “Youth” singer Shawn (6)
4. shocked (9)
5. what a dog wags (4)
6. bad news at the dentist (6)
7. crime solver (9)

SUR

ITY

SED

TCH

POL

DES

DET

IVE

TA

SWI

PRI

MEN

CAV

ISH

ECT

IL

The Mini Page® © 2020 Andrews McMeel Syndication

You’ll need:
• 1 cup chopped yellow onion
• 4 bone-in, skinless chicken breast halves
(about 7 ounces each)
• Salt and black pepper

©2017 Blue Ox Technologies Ltd. Download the app on Apple and Amazon devices.

Italian Chicken With Baby Carrots

* You’ll need an adult’s help with this recipe.

Cook’s Corner

adapted with permission from Earthweek.com

For later:

Look through your newspaper for
phrases that come from Shakespeare.

Teachers: Follow and
interact with The Mini
Page on Facebook!

Call Meta at
1-800-293-4709
to place a
sponsor ad on
this page.

Dave’s

Cooling, Heating & Plumbing
Sales • Installation • Service
On Most Makes and Models
886-2233 • 942-4357

davescoolheat@aol.com

Answers: switch, polish, Mendes, surprised, tail, cavity, detective.

1300 WEST MAIN STREET, WAYNESBORO, VA 22980

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